New York Constitutional Convention

Under New York’s constitution, every twenty years voters get an opportunity to decide if they wish to overhaul — or tinker with — their state constitution. The below "roadmap" offers a basic view on how that process works. You can hover your cursor over each number to get more detail on each of the "stops" along the way to "Conventionland."

In addition to getting more information by clicking on numbers on the game board, please take a look at our short Guide to the New York State Convention Process.

We offer this a an educational service to all New Yorkers.


Stop #1: Every 20 years, the New York State Constitution requires that the public decide if it wants to update its constitution. The next vote is November 2017. Stop #2: Will the process for selecting delegates stay the same? Reformers want there to be a legislative debate over the rules for electing delegates and the openness requirements for the convention’s proceedings in advance of the public vote. Knowing the ground rules for delegate selection will be a factor for many New Yorkers in how they decide to cast their votes on the convention question. Stop #3: The public votes on whether to hold a convention. If the majority of votes cast on the convention question are “yes,” then the process continues. If the majority votes down a convention, no convention happens and the “road” to a convention ends. Stop #4: Voters choose who they want to be delegates at the convention. At the next general election following the voters’ approval to convene a convention (November 2018), voters choose three (3) delegates from each State Senate District (there are 63 Senate districts), and fifteen (15) are elected statewide. Thus, the convention would consist of a total of 204 delegates. Anyone who is eligible to vote can run for delegate. The processes for getting on the ballot and running a campaign are the same as those running for any other state office. Split-ticket voting for the 15 statewide delegates has historically been extremely difficult. Stop #5:  The convention, consisting of its 204 delegates, begins its deliberations the first Tuesday of April 2019 and continues until work is completed. Stop #6: As the convention begins, the delegates will likely organize themselves to consider changes to the Constitution, such as creating committees to examine specific areas of the constitution (e.g., environmental policies). Stop #7: The convention begins to discuss changes.   Anything can be on the agenda since it is not possible to limit the scope of a convention. Stop #8: The delegates decide on which changes they agree should be part of a new Constitution.  A key decision will be whether the proposed changes are voted on as one package or as separate individual amendments. Stop #9: Whatever changes emerge from the convention are then sent to the voters for final approval. New Yorkers go to the polls the following November (2019 at the earliest) to approve or reject the changes. Stop #10: Any changes that are approved in a statewide referendum go into effect January 1st in the year after the vote is held.   If rejected, the Constitution does not change.
New York lawmakers fall short of climate goals as session ends  (Politico, June 9, 2022)
The Price of Life  (The Lost Debate, July 5, 2022)
Transit Advocates to MTA: Queens Bus Redesign Needs Some Key Tweaks  (Streetsblog, June 29, 2022)
Paying to play in Albany  (WAMC, June 27, 2022)
Beyond Plastics: Shifting The Waste Reduction Burden From Consumers To Producers  (Forbes, June 27, 2022)
Brooklyn Assembly race overshadowed by candidate’s appointment of dead woman to Dem party post  (New York Daily News, June 26, 2022 )
An outsider’s view: Groups calls for commission to probe state’s COVID response  (NNY 360, June 24, 2022)
New York needs an independent review of response  (Williamsport Sun-Gazette,, June 24, 2022)
Letter: Gov. Hochul must stop cryptomining that relies on fossil fuels  (Syracuse.com, June 24, 2022)
Hochul Has Raised $34 Million So Far. Her Goal May Be Double That.  (The New York Times, June 24, 2022)
New York may partially ban cryptocurrency mining if Hochul doesn't veto it  (Politico, June 17, 2022)
Good-government groups back New York ethics panel selection plan  (Spectrum News, June 22, 2022)
Conduct an independent review of New York’s COVID-19 response  (Herald Democrat, June 21, 2022)
A step forward on ethics?  (WAMC, June 20, 2022)
Early voting starts Saturday, but will voters show up?  (Spectrum News, June 17, 2022)
Law school deans unveil New York's new ethics system  (Albany Times-Union, June 15, 2022)
City leaders, advocates press for better bus lanes amid expansion  (Gothamist, June 16, 2022)
Blair Horner discuses the 2022 Legislative Session on The Capitol Connection  (WAMC, June 16, 2022)
Conduct an independent review of New York's COVID-19 response  (The Citizen, June 15, 2022)
Watchdog groups press Hochul for independent COVID review  (NY1, June 14, 2022)
News Archive
Governor Approves Three Steps Toward Meeting Goals of Climate Leadership & Community Protection Act (CLCPA)
NYPIRG Applauds Move and Urges Governor to Sign Cryptocurrency Moratorium Act, and Include All-Electric Building Act and EV Car Charging Station Expansion Bill in 2023 Executive Budget
Policy Close Up: Climate Scorecard 2022
NYPIRG Submits 2022 Climate Action Council Draft Scoping Plan Comments
NYPIRG Releases “Albany Money Machine”
Albany Fundraising Fires up, Despite Pandemic
137 Fundraisers in Albany, or Virtual, or by Leadership During 2022
New “Normal” a Lot Like the Old One
Straphangers Campaign Hosts Bus Lane Painting Party — Celebrate Plans for 20 Miles of New Bus Lanes in 2022
State Court Rules DEC Can Deny Permit on Danskammer Fracked Gas Power Plant as It Undermines NYS's Climate Law
NEW! NYPIRG's updated Legislative Profiles offer New Yorkers a “one-stop” opportunity to conveniently examine publicly-available information on their state legislators.
Tale of the Tape: NYPIRG’S 2022 Legislative Review
Number of Bills that Passed Both Houses Increased
Governor's Use of Emergency "Messages of Necessity" Jumps
NYPIRG reacts to the environmental actions of the 2022 session. The State Legislature passed three major bills in the last days of session which place New York in the national forefront on energy efficient standards, expansion of geothermal renewable energy, union just transition, and hit the appropriate pause button on cryptocurrency mining.
VICTORY! News Release: NYPIRG Celebrates Passage of Right to Repair Bill by NYS Legislature
Release: Mayday Distress Signal for Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act Without Passage of All-Electric Buildings Act this Session
NYPIRG and over 50 other environmental and community organizations call on Governor Hochul and state legislative leaders to make the climate polluters pay. NYPIRG also joined state Senator Krueger and Assemblymember Dinowitz calling for the oil, gas, and coal industries to be held financially liable for the costs of global warming
*UPDATE: NYPIRG will be working with Donald Ross’ family and friends to organize an event celebrating his life. We are planning on the event occurring sometime in the early fall.
NYPIRG, Statewide Groups and Legislators Hold 40th Birthday Party for the “Bottle Bill” Advocates Call on State Legislature to Pass Bill This Session to Expand and Modernize NY’s Most Successful Recycling and Extended Producer Responsibility Law
Donald Ross, 1943-2022 – We are saddened by the loss of Donald Ross, our first executive director and a lifelong, visionary champion for the public interest.
217 Groups Call on Legislature to Pass Climate Justice CLCPA Building Bills for Earth Week
NYPIRG calls higher education budget a step forward, but much more needs to be done.
NEW! Fossil-Free Future Campaign: Help Make New York State a Leader in the Fight to Combat Climate Change
NYPIRG Reacts to the Process of State Budget-Making as Well as Democracy Reforms Contained Within the Budget Agreement
Energy & Environment Wins & Losses in 2022 State Budget
Reports & Features Archive