New York Constitutional Convention

Under New York’s constitution, every twenty years voters get an opportunity to decide if they wish to overhaul — or tinker with — their state constitution. The below "roadmap" offers a basic view on how that process works. You can hover your cursor over each number to get more detail on each of the "stops" along the way to "Conventionland."

In addition to getting more information by clicking on numbers on the game board, please take a look at our short Guide to the New York State Convention Process.

We offer this a an educational service to all New Yorkers.


Stop #1: Every 20 years, the New York State Constitution requires that the public decide if it wants to update its constitution. The next vote is November 2017. Stop #2: Will the process for selecting delegates stay the same? Reformers want there to be a legislative debate over the rules for electing delegates and the openness requirements for the convention’s proceedings in advance of the public vote. Knowing the ground rules for delegate selection will be a factor for many New Yorkers in how they decide to cast their votes on the convention question. Stop #3: The public votes on whether to hold a convention. If the majority of votes cast on the convention question are “yes,” then the process continues. If the majority votes down a convention, no convention happens and the “road” to a convention ends. Stop #4: Voters choose who they want to be delegates at the convention. At the next general election following the voters’ approval to convene a convention (November 2018), voters choose three (3) delegates from each State Senate District (there are 63 Senate districts), and fifteen (15) are elected statewide. Thus, the convention would consist of a total of 204 delegates. Anyone who is eligible to vote can run for delegate. The processes for getting on the ballot and running a campaign are the same as those running for any other state office. Split-ticket voting for the 15 statewide delegates has historically been extremely difficult. Stop #5:  The convention, consisting of its 204 delegates, begins its deliberations the first Tuesday of April 2019 and continues until work is completed. Stop #6: As the convention begins, the delegates will likely organize themselves to consider changes to the Constitution, such as creating committees to examine specific areas of the constitution (e.g., environmental policies). Stop #7: The convention begins to discuss changes.   Anything can be on the agenda since it is not possible to limit the scope of a convention. Stop #8: The delegates decide on which changes they agree should be part of a new Constitution.  A key decision will be whether the proposed changes are voted on as one package or as separate individual amendments. Stop #9: Whatever changes emerge from the convention are then sent to the voters for final approval. New Yorkers go to the polls the following November (2019 at the earliest) to approve or reject the changes. Stop #10: Any changes that are approved in a statewide referendum go into effect January 1st in the year after the vote is held.   If rejected, the Constitution does not change.
Out of office, Cuomo uses power of campaign account  (Spectrum News, September 23, 2021)
Redistricting is on the ballot again in November. Here’s what voters will be considering.  (City & State, September 22, 2021)
As Council moves to confirm new BOE commissioner, watchdogs call for more transparency  (Politico, September 22, 2021)
State Senate Examines Board of Elections at Oversight Hearing  (Gotham Gazette, September 22, 2021)
Memo from Hochul’s Office calls for greater transparency  (Binghamton Homepage, September 21, 2021)
Blair Horner discusses legislative redistricting with Mark Dunlea of the Hudson Mohawk Radio Networks  (The Santuary for Independent Media)
The state inspector general's oversight waned under Cuomo  (Albany Times-Union, September 19, 2021)
Brooklyn-based Haitian Students Hail CUNY Debt Forgiveness “Comeback Program”  (Our Time Press, September 18, 2021)
New redistricting maps draw criticism  (Rome Sentinel, September 18, 2021)
Redistricting panel releases competing NY political maps  (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, September 16, 2021)
NYPIRG’s Blair Horner weighs in on draft redistricting maps  (NY1, September 15, 2021)
Redistricting panel releases competing NY political maps  (Midland Daily News, September 15, 2021)
With dueling Congress maps, NY Redistricting on path to legislative takeover  (Newsday, September 15, 2021)
New York Will Soon Lose 1 House Seat. The G.O.P. Might Lose 5.  (The New York Times, September 14, 2021)
Preliminary Work Permit At Controversial Power Plant Approved  (Patch, September 10, 2021)
Big Oil must pay before we all do  (NY Daily News, September 9, 2021)
Cuomo under fire for re-hiring flack, good-government groups demand probe  (NY Daily News, September 9, 2021)
Will Kathy Hochul support a carbon tax?  (City & State, September 9, 2021)
Pressure builds for state to investigate Cuomo campaign spending; Hochul leaves open the door  (Albany Times-Union, September 9, 2021)
DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos says Greenidge Generation’s bitcoin effort does not comply with New York State climate law  (Fingerlakes1, September 9, 2021)
News Archive
NY Congress Members Urge Speaker Pelosi to Make Polluters Pay for Climate Destruction Costs
Upstate New York Likely to Lose Representation in Congressional Delegation and State Senate If New Maps Reflect Changes in Population
NYPIRG Statement on the August 2021 report released by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Release: Leading Climate & Social Justice Organizations Rally Around Make Polluters Pay Plan
Letter: Leading Climate & Social Justice Organizations Rally Around Make Polluters Pay Plan
NYPIRG Calls for Creation of Public Dashboard to Measure Progress Toward New York’s Climate Goals
Letter to DEC: NYPIRG Calls for Clear and Accessible Public Reporting on Climate Progress
Tale of the Tape: NYPIRG’s 2021 Legislative Review
Environmental groups call for a moratorium on the operation of cryptocurrency mining centers
NYPIRG Statement on Passage of Legislation to Ensure All New Yorkers Have Testing for Dangerous Unregulated Contaminants
On Eve Of 50th Anniversary Of NY's Approval Of The 26th Amendment, NYPIRG and120+ College Groups Urge Lawmakers To Approve Legislation Placing Polling Places On Colleges
Council Members, Climate Activists New York City Council to Enact Gas Free NYC Bill to Reduce Air Pollution and Create Green Jobs
NYPIRG Reacts to Closure of Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant
NYPIRG reacts to Census reapportionment numbers - NY will lose one seat in the U.S. House of Representatives
NYPIRG and other watchdog organizations call for hearings into scandals and failures of ethics oversight
2021 State Budget Reaction
Civic Groups urge the New York City Board of Elections to reinstate its public comment period
NYPIRG and New York's leading civic organizations call for an overhaul in ethics enforcement. The coalition urges that the Joint Commission on Public Ethics (JCOPE) be replaced and a new independent ethics watchdog be created.
Statement on New Information Regarding PFAs Incineration at Norlite Plant in Cohoes
NYPIRG Reacts to Final Count in Congressional District 22 Race – Stunning Failures in Elections Administration Must be Investigated and Reforms Advanced to Restore Voter Confidence
Reports & Features Archive