New York Constitutional Convention

Under New York’s constitution, every twenty years voters get an opportunity to decide if they wish to overhaul — or tinker with — their state constitution. The below "roadmap" offers a basic view on how that process works. You can hover your cursor over each number to get more detail on each of the "stops" along the way to "Conventionland."

In addition to getting more information by clicking on numbers on the game board, please take a look at our short Guide to the New York State Convention Process.

We offer this a an educational service to all New Yorkers.


Stop #1: Every 20 years, the New York State Constitution requires that the public decide if it wants to update its constitution. The next vote is November 2017. Stop #2: Will the process for selecting delegates stay the same? Reformers want there to be a legislative debate over the rules for electing delegates and the openness requirements for the convention’s proceedings in advance of the public vote. Knowing the ground rules for delegate selection will be a factor for many New Yorkers in how they decide to cast their votes on the convention question. Stop #3: The public votes on whether to hold a convention. If the majority of votes cast on the convention question are “yes,” then the process continues. If the majority votes down a convention, no convention happens and the “road” to a convention ends. Stop #4: Voters choose who they want to be delegates at the convention. At the next general election following the voters’ approval to convene a convention (November 2018), voters choose three (3) delegates from each State Senate District (there are 63 Senate districts), and fifteen (15) are elected statewide. Thus, the convention would consist of a total of 204 delegates. Anyone who is eligible to vote can run for delegate. The processes for getting on the ballot and running a campaign are the same as those running for any other state office. Split-ticket voting for the 15 statewide delegates has historically been extremely difficult. Stop #5:  The convention, consisting of its 204 delegates, begins its deliberations the first Tuesday of April 2019 and continues until work is completed. Stop #6: As the convention begins, the delegates will likely organize themselves to consider changes to the Constitution, such as creating committees to examine specific areas of the constitution (e.g., environmental policies). Stop #7: The convention begins to discuss changes.   Anything can be on the agenda since it is not possible to limit the scope of a convention. Stop #8: The delegates decide on which changes they agree should be part of a new Constitution.  A key decision will be whether the proposed changes are voted on as one package or as separate individual amendments. Stop #9: Whatever changes emerge from the convention are then sent to the voters for final approval. New Yorkers go to the polls the following November (2019 at the earliest) to approve or reject the changes. Stop #10: Any changes that are approved in a statewide referendum go into effect January 1st in the year after the vote is held.   If rejected, the Constitution does not change.
New York kicks off its new voluntary system of public financing of elections  (WAMC, November 21, 2022)
Advocates Call For Bottle Bill Modernization  (WNY News, November 22, 2022)
Environmental advocates call on Gov. Hochul to modernize the Bottle Bill  (Erie News Now, November 22, 2022)
Advocates call for update to New York's "bottle bill"  (CBS 6 Albany, November 21, 2022)
Why advocates want to expand New York's bottle deposit law  (Spectrum News, November 21, 2022)
NY's ranking in hospital safety grades improves, but far from best in U.S.  (Poughkeepsie Journal, November 21, 2022)
Hochul faces many issues in first full term  (Oneonta Daily Star, November 21, 2022)
CNY advocates push for statewide climate initiatives  (WRVO, November 20, 2022)
Purple Districts, Motivated Voters and Polarizing Issues — Experts Unpack Hudson Valley Election Results  (The Legislative Gazette, November 18, 2022)
Climate organizations raise awareness on campaign addressing climate change  (The Daily Orange, November 17, 2022)
Coalición exige tiempos de espera de trenes y buses no mayores de seis minutos  (El Diario, November 17, 2022)
Gov. Hochul should empower consumers  (New York Daily News, November 16, 2022)
Advocates, lawmakers push for billions in funding to fight climate change  (Spectrum News, November 16, 2022)
Local Organizations Rally for NY Renews Climate Justice Package at Thompson Park  (Ithaca.com, November 16, 2022)
The 2022 election in New York  (WAMC, November 14, 2022)
Let’s do it again: New push for probe of Cuomo’s $5M COVID-19 book deal  (New York Post, November 14, 2022)
Groups urge state ethics watchdog to probe $5M Cuomo book approval, failed policies  (Spectrum News, November 14, 2022)
Where voter turnout dropped, rose in NY and its impact on the 2022 election results  (Spectrum News, November 14, 2022)
Kathy Hochul won election as NY governor. What happens next?  (Newsday, November 12, 2022)
GOP Rep.-elect Mike Lawler on how he defeated Sean Patrick Maloney  (Spectrum News, November 11, 2022)
News Archive
NYPIRG Applauds Passage of Environmental Bond Act, Urges Gov and Lawmakers to Act on Additional Measures
126 Groups Urge Governor & CAC to Support All-Electric Buildings Start in 2024
UPCOMING EVENTS! Securing Our Future: Saving Social Security from the Chopping Block
Watchdogs Ask New Members of Commission on Ethics and Lobbying in Government to Reset Expectations about NYS Ethics Oversight
Groups’ Recommendations Would Improve Enforcement, Transparency, and Training
Reform groups urge the new state ethics commission to get to work this month
NYPIRG Straphangers Campaign and TransitCenter Release 17th Annual Pokey and Schleppie Awards on Bus Performance
Governor Approves Three Steps Toward Meeting Goals of Climate Leadership & Community Protection Act (CLCPA)
NYPIRG Applauds Move and Urges Governor to Sign Cryptocurrency Moratorium Act, and Include All-Electric Building Act and EV Car Charging Station Expansion Bill in 2023 Executive Budget
Policy Close Up: Climate Scorecard 2022
NYPIRG Submits 2022 Climate Action Council Draft Scoping Plan Comments
NYPIRG Releases “Albany Money Machine”
Albany Fundraising Fires up, Despite Pandemic
137 Fundraisers in Albany, or Virtual, or by Leadership During 2022
New “Normal” a Lot Like the Old One
Straphangers Campaign Hosts Bus Lane Painting Party — Celebrate Plans for 20 Miles of New Bus Lanes in 2022
State Court Rules DEC Can Deny Permit on Danskammer Fracked Gas Power Plant as It Undermines NYS's Climate Law
NEW! NYPIRG's updated Legislative Profiles offer New Yorkers a “one-stop” opportunity to conveniently examine publicly-available information on their state legislators.
Tale of the Tape: NYPIRG’S 2022 Legislative Review
Number of Bills that Passed Both Houses Increased
Governor's Use of Emergency "Messages of Necessity" Jumps
NYPIRG reacts to the environmental actions of the 2022 session. The State Legislature passed three major bills in the last days of session which place New York in the national forefront on energy efficient standards, expansion of geothermal renewable energy, union just transition, and hit the appropriate pause button on cryptocurrency mining.
VICTORY! News Release: NYPIRG Celebrates Passage of Right to Repair Bill by NYS Legislature
Release: Mayday Distress Signal for Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act Without Passage of All-Electric Buildings Act this Session
NYPIRG and over 50 other environmental and community organizations call on Governor Hochul and state legislative leaders to make the climate polluters pay. NYPIRG also joined state Senator Krueger and Assemblymember Dinowitz calling for the oil, gas, and coal industries to be held financially liable for the costs of global warming
*UPDATE: NYPIRG will be working with Donald Ross’ family and friends to organize an event celebrating his life. We are planning on the event occurring sometime in the early fall.
NYPIRG, Statewide Groups and Legislators Hold 40th Birthday Party for the “Bottle Bill” Advocates Call on State Legislature to Pass Bill This Session to Expand and Modernize NY’s Most Successful Recycling and Extended Producer Responsibility Law
Reports & Features Archive